Week of January 14, 2002



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BLACK HISTORY MONTH TO BE CELEBRATED AT SOUTHEAST

CAPE GIRARDEAU, Mo., Jan. 11, 2001 Southeast Missouri State University will celebrate Black History Month in February with a number of events designed to commemorate the heritage of African-Americans.

Events will get under way with "Native Americans: The Red-Black Connection," an exhibition of photographs by Valena Broussard Dismukes. The exhibition will be on display from Feb. 4-28 in the University Center Program Lounge. It will be open to the public daily from 8 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. The University Center will also hold its annual book sale Feb. 4-28 in the University Center lobby. The book sale will feature historical and contemporary African-American literature. It will be open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. daily.

Come and relax at the "Spoken Word Coffee House" Feb. 6, 13, 20 and 27 in the Johnson Faculty Centre. Every Wednesday evening from 7 to 10 p.m. during the month of February, students will have the opportunity to share and discuss a variety of literary and musical works by African-Americans. Students also are invited to share their own literary works. This event is free and open to the public. For more information, contact Wendy Tillman at (573) 986-6135.

On Feb. 11, alumnus Joseph Dunlap will speak to a series of classes relating to education and professional development at noon in the University Center. A reception will follow. This event is open to all students. For more information, contact Trent Ball in the Office of Minority Student Programs at (573) 986-6135.

A program titled, "AIDS in the Black Community," will be held twice on Feb. 12, from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. and from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. in the University Center Program Lounge. All students are invited to attend and take part in this informative and interactive dialogue discussing the impact of AIDS in the Black community. For more information, contact Wendy Tillman at (573) 986-6135.

On Feb. 13, minority students will have the opportunity to attend the Minority Student Career Exploration Dinner from 5 to 7 p.m. in the Atrium of Robert A. Dempster Hall. The keynote speaker will be Thomas Wallace, vice chancellor of student affairs, at the University of Mississippi. The purpose of this event is to proactively involve Southeast minority students in mentoring and networking activities that enhance their understanding of the value of education in obtaining career goals and success. For more information, contact Jerry Lee Westbrook, director of career services, at (573) 651-2583.

The public is invited to attend a lecture and planetarium experience on Feb. 15, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the University Center Program Lounge. It will explore how slaves during the Civil War used the constellations to find their way north. Through the use of a video presentation, created by NASA, and an indoor inflatable planetarium, participants will learn about these unique African-continent constellations. For more information, contact Jackie Wortman at (573) 986-6778.

On Feb. 17, the Annual Michael Davis Lecture will be presented at 7 p.m. in the University Center Ballroom. This event recognizes the contributions of African-Americans in the media. The event also honors the late Michael Davis, a mass communications student at Southeast who died as a result of a hazing incident. This event is free and open to the public. For more information, contact Dr. Ferrell Ervin, chair of the Department of Communication, at (573) 651-5967.

The Fifth Annual Read-A-Thon will begin Feb. 18 and run through March 8. University students and volunteers will present multi-cultural reading and activities to children in pre-kindergarten to fourth grade. Reading will consist of multicultural literature on historical Americans and their contributions to the development of our great nation. For more information, contact Joyce Renaud at (573) 651-2499.

On Feb. 18, "Native Americans: The Red-Black Connection 500 Years of Red-Black People," a program by Valena Broussard Dismukes, will be presented at 7 p.m. in the University Center Program Lounge. Dismukes will present a lecture and slide show about the connection between African-Americans and Native-Americans. A reception will follow. This program is open to the public. For more information, contact Dr. Carol Morrow at (573) 651-5934.

On Feb. 19, a Knowledge Bowl will be held at 7 p.m. in the University Center Club. This contest will test participants' knowledge of African-American history and culture. Prizes will be awarded. For more information, contact Reginald Jennings at (573) 986-6135.

A Common Hour presentation titled, "Black Indians: An American Story," will be held on Feb. 20, at noon in the University Center Program Lounge. This Common Hour presentation will include a video on Black Indians, introduced by Valena Broussard Dismukes. A brief discussion will follow. The public is invited to attend this presentation. For more information, contact Dr. Carol Morrow at (573) 651-5934.

A program titled, "Degrees of Difference: Cultural Matters on Campus," will be held twice on Feb. 21, from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. and from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. in the University Center Program Lounge. This program is designed to support faculty, staff, students and administrators in rethinking policies and procedures with respect to social and cultural differences. This program is open to the public. For more information, contact Trent Ball at (573) 986-6135.

Black movie weekend Feb. 22-23, will showcase decades of African-American cinema. Films will be shown from 4 to 10 p.m. both nights in the Johnson Faculty Centre. This event is open to all students. For more information, contact D'Ante DuCasse at (573) 651-1382.

Black History Month events will conclude with "Sharecropper Strike of 1939: A Photographic Exhibit." This exhibit will be on display in the University Center Program Lounge Feb. 25-26, from 8 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. The public is invited to view this collection of approximately 60 black and white photographs taken during the Bootheel Sharecropper's Strike of 1939. As part of the exhibit, a panel discussion and video regarding the strike will be held. For more information, contact Dr. Joel Rhodes at (573) 651-2715.

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LEE NAMED DIRECTOR OF PLANNED GIVING

CAPE GIRARDEAU, Mo., Jan. 11, 2002 Trudy Lee has been named director of planned giving in the University Foundation at Southeast Missouri State University.

"I am very much looking forward to working with Southeast's alumni, friends, faculty and staff to create a strong and vibrant charitable gift planning program," said Lee.

Over the past five years, Lee has been the planned giving manager for the University of New Mexico. Prior to entering the field of planned gift fundraising, Lee received her a bachelor of science degree in legal administration from the University of Evansville, attained her designation as a Certified Legal Assistant (CLA), and worked as a paralegal in Albuquerque, N.M., for more than 15 years.

While at the University of New Mexico, Lee established its planned gift recognition society and planned giving advisory board, developed comprehensive gift acceptance policies and procedures, and created educational websites, newsletters and seminars for both alumni and friends of the University and professional advisors in the community. As a result, during her tenure, Lee was involved in creating more than 100 new planned gifts and completing bequests totaling over $20 million.

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MISSOURI POET TO READ FROM HER WORKS JAN. 29

CAPE GIRARDEAU, Mo., Jan. 11, 2002 -- Missouri poet and editor Catie Rosemurgy will read from her original works at 7 p.m. Jan. 29 in Crisp Hall Auditorium Room 125.

She also will sign copies of her recent and critically-acclaimed book, My Favorite Apocalypse, which is published by the prestigious Graywolf Press. Her fearless poems risk topics from coming-of-age to Mick Jagger, in a style that critics have compared to Yeats and Lorca.

Her work has appeared in such places as Ploughshares, Poetry Northwest, River Styx, Michigan Quarterly Review and The Best American Poetry 1997. She teaches creative writing at Northwest Missouri State University, where she also co-edits The Laurel Review.

The reading is sponsored by Funding for Results and the Department of English, and is free and open to the public. For further information, contact Dr. Susan Swartwout at (573) 651-2641.

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